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Thursday, 3 December 2009

"Liturgical Music - Where has it gone?"

This blog post from a Catholic deacon, asks that question, and judging from the fact that the sober-looking guy who who he thinks has the answer to the question and the solution to the implicit problem, is shown seated, calmly, on the bench of an organ, at the beginning of the video, and that the deacon goes on to say that "a sense of the extreme Holiness of the Mass [needs to be brought] back into our churches through Sacred and Truly Liturgical Music," I really, really, really, really want to know what it is.

But my computer, which Robert Fulton and Alexander Bell seem to have made in their spar time does not like the video, (which seems to begin with the Jacques Arcadelt Ave Maria.)

So if anyone else watches it, will ya please TELL me?

3 comments:

Dad29 said...

Ummnnnhh....meh.

Yes, it was the Arcadelt.

Then he talked about selection of hymns, a little about Chant, and the nature of worship.

NOTHING like the depth of learning at the Colloquium

Scelata said...

Thanks so much, Dad29.
I tke it is part of the general trending in the right direction, however?

(I'm thinking I'm going to have to bite the bullet and scrape together the money to buy SOME kind of device that doesn't leave me out in the cold as far as sound files and videos -- I'm always very grateful when people post transcripts of things.)

Save the Liturgy, Save the World!

Charles said...

Wow, that was underwhelming.
One, has Mr. LePage ever heard of "Arcadelt, take two."?
Pars secunda, of what merit is PLAYING the Arcadelt in the context of what Mr. LePage means to advance, ever so slowly in his exhortation?
Okay, sorry for the snark. I really try not to do that; but Scelata understands and is to be obeyed.
What Dad says is right about the yapping versus participating (wow, a V2 term!) at colloquiums. No amount of listening to Ed Foley or even Anthony Ruff lecture can compare to the intent and purpose of preparing, uh, "real" sacred music for use at, uh, "real liturgies" every day of six days of musical heaven.
The Rev. Mr. Diakonos seems a hearty fellow, earnest despite his wheelies.
But were I advising him about content on his blog, I'd huddle up and tell him to "go long."
Short down and outs we've had for forty years of desert.